May 13, 2012

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Promisetown Tales
Michael Walker
1999-20012

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All characters depicted in Promisetown Tales are the property of Michael Walker.
These characters and events are fictional and any resemblance to persons living, dead,
or fictional or situations past, present, or fictional is purely and completely coincidental.

 

[ Table of Contents ]

 

Follow-up Note from Michael Walker
(*with italicized comments from Patrick Boast)

*In the novel, Promisetown Tales, Patrick Boast is the Pulitzer Prize winning author who was once the lover of Cynthia Wiles Hemingway.

In May of 2001, a series of personal and worldwide events convinced me to stop writing the on-line novel, Promisetown Tales. Some of these included the sudden and unexpected death of someone dear to me, various and sundry political events, and overwork (I was then writing a weekly real estate column, working a day job, and a few other Herculean tasks.)

Without any advance notice, I ceased writing on all fronts and closed Promisetown Tales and its characters from my mind, the world, the ethers.

Or did I?

Since that time, wounds have healed (leaving the expected scar tissues), I started to slowly understand the futility involved in worrying about things I have no control over, and I managed to begin and see the launching of my website, dreamwalkergroup.com.

But the most important thing of all is that the characters in Promisetown Tales had started to rattle the chain link fence that was separating my mind from my muses.

Cynthia, Maxwell, Ruby -- and even the mysterious Patrick Boast, wanted their stories revealed.

I ignored them at first, these vermin, relegating them to the back burner of my conscious mind. But every day, for months, I'd wake up to discover that they had managed to shift the pots and pans of their wills to the front of the stove top, closer to my conscious awareness.

And later than sooner, I came to understand that they would not be ignored.

Now, as a writer, I generally have a hate/love relationship with my fictional characters. I somehow create them from some place within myself -- or do I simply just acknowledge them? -- and before long they go from being my creative creations to demanding, insistent offspring. In my last novel, for instance (Cherished Foes), I took four chapters to introduce the buggers, to set forth their character traits and hint at their motivations, After that, they took over the story and not even I knew where it would take me.

For this writer of Promisetown Tales, the characters also began as rather passive entities -- after all, I was their Creator. But many writers will concur that this honeymoon stage doesn't last long. Not long at all. Before I knew it, each character began to reveal things about themselves that surprised even me. And like egotistical children, they began to become overly insistent.

In my Pulitzer Prize winning Big Foot, the main character, Ames, began as a mere pencil sketch on a bar napkin. When I started the actual writing, I casually filled in that stick drawing of an idea with color, form, and personality (though certain critics suggested that Ames lacked personality -- and I dedicate my Pulitzer to them). Again, by Chapter Four, I was as surprised as the readers to discover Ames' startling secret. In Pock Mark, my novella written from the point of view of the moon's surface, each character seemed to materialize out of nowhere, like gnats. The beautiful Hawk Kincaid was the worst -- but I eventually came to hate them all.

Personally, I don't know how I felt (and feel) about my four (for now) protagonists. Love, hate, admiration, loathing, awe, delight, or ... But I knew that if I started writing Promisetown Tales again, it would have to be under their terms. And so it shall be -- and understandably I'm a little afraid.

I know now that they are the ones in charge -- that I am nothing more than their vehicle of opportunity (to them, my spawn, any writer would do just as well). And my acceptance of that fact, even if reluctant, has been the key to my continued success.

The characters in Promisetown Tales are all creative sorts -- and are each quite capable of expressing their creativity through the written word -- in one form or another. Last week, as another year rattled to a close, they four -- Cynthia Wiles Hemingway, Maxwell Wellington, Patrick Boast, and Ruby-Less-Begonia -- approached my psyche with a novel (and challenging) idea. Since they're each writers, they wanted a piece of the proverbial pie. When I asked them for clarification, they made it very clear that the only way they would collaborate with me on this book was if I would give them a free rein, including the right to spin their own tales.

Impossible, I argued. But the only way they insisted in unison.

And so, with great apprehension on my part, Promisetown Tales continues . Wish us well (especially me) as the stories set sail once more.

Pick Up Where We Left Off  (Bit 14, Max loved his work)

Author Notes

See also:

 

All characters depicted in Promisetown Tales are the property of Michael Walker.
These characters and events are fictional and any resemblance to persons living, dead,
or fictional or situations past, present, or fictional is purely and completely coincidental.

[ Table of Contents ]

 

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All characters depicted in Promisetown Tales are the property of Michael Walker.
These characters and events are fictional and any resemblance to persons living, dead,
or fictional or situations past, present, or fictional is purely and completely coincidental.

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AFFORDABLE SOCIAL MEDIA, PUBLICITY, BRAND/NAME RECOGNITION, BLOG CONTENT & more